200 Years of Young Adult Library Services History

The Chronology

I would also have in every library a friend of the young, whom they can consult freely when in want of assistance, and who, in addition to the power of gaining their confidence, has knowledge and tact enough to render them real aid in making selections. —Samuel S. Green. (from Sensational Fiction in Public Libraries, Library Journal 4, no. 9 (1879): 345-355, 352.)

[Editor’s Note: The following chronology is a work in progress. The first Chronology was compiled by Anthony Bernier, Mary K. Chelton, Christine A. Jenkins, and Jennifer Burek Pierce and published in the June 2005 VOYA, and later updated in 2007 by Anthony Bernier and Catherine Dunn MacRae. Submissions are welcome from anyone in the library profession who wishes to suggest additional items. The chronology is available on VOYA’s website at http://www.voyamagazine.com/2010/03/30/chronology/, and also accessible through a link on the Young Adult Library Services Association’s (YALSA) site at http://www.ala.org/yalsa, under “Professional Development Center.” Dr. Mary K. Chelton manages additions and updates. If you wish to contribute, please word your submission briefly in the format of this chronology. Include a complete citation of your source as well as your own contact information with street address, phone, and e-mail. E-mail your submission to mchelton@optonline.net with “Chronology Submission” in the subject line.

Why We Compiled This Chronology

Traces of librarians’ efforts to comply with Green’s wishes [as expressed above in 1879] and to provide young readers, particularly adolescents, with friendly support in libraries can be found in myriad sources, but few of these sources are widely known.—JBP.

Several years ago I wrote a literature review of youth services librarianship historiography for the journal Libraries & Culture, and noted that this history was wide-open for study. There has been some progress since then, but basically the history of youth services librarianship as a field of study is still as wide-open as ever. As with many other activities involving women and children, youth services librarianship has been simultaneously revered and ignored, and the origins and history of library service to youth are only beginning to be seriously examined by library historians.

According to Jesse Hauk Shera’s canonical history of early American libraries, Foundations of the Public Library (University of Chicago Press, 1949), the 1803 founding of the Bingham Library for Youth in Salisbury, Connecticut, was “the first instance in which a municipal governing body contributed active financial assistance to public library service” (160). Thus a library created specifically for young people was the first public library as the term is currently understood. Thirty-one years later in 1834, the Peterborough Town Library in New Hampshire was founded and became a far more well-known claimant to the “earliest public library” designation. Although the Peterborough library was for residents of all ages, it is interesting to note that more than half of its inaugural collection—approximately 200 books out of 370—was described as “the Juvenile Library.” From the very earliest years, children and adolescents clearly have been a significant constituent group of library users.

The early scholars of women’s history knew that women were a significant presence throughout the past—the task was not so much to ferret out an obscure history but to make the invisible visible. The same holds true for library scholars who strive to place young people—and the women (and some men) who worked with them—in the mainstream rather than the margins.

Historically children have been viewed as peripheral to history, and those who work with them have often been dismissed as inconsequential. But the library record tells a different story. Throughout the history of American public libraries, photos of young people using libraries have adorned annual reports from coast to coast. We know they were there. Now it is time to find them.—CAJ.

Interest in compiling this chronology grew out of frustration with several recently published books on YA services that, although otherwise commendable, seem either badly researched or ignorant of YA services history. It also emerged from the need to have a tool to use in teaching so that our students can get a better idea of where YA services came from, and to enhance the poor documentation for the few historical accounts that exist. We hope that such a chronology will inspire state-level counterparts that might be added to the national record. In terms of scope, the chronology attempts to consolidate the history of the two teen-serving divisions of the American Library Association (ALA): the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) and the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) with several other accounts of library history. This chronology is in no way comprehensive in terms of either all possible existing documented sources or in terms of parallel world, national, or local events affecting youth and their library services. Ideally it should be that comprehensive, and our hope is that future authors and scholars will fill in relevant gaps.—MKC.

Given what I feel is a culture ever hardening to its young people, the untold story of the struggle to legitimize our work with them remains a damaging omission in librarians’ professional legacy. On the other hand, this first substantial step toward documenting that legacy offers us the opportunity to take back some of what is truly ours, as well as to advance what we contribute to our institutions and to our society. It will also help us to call forward tomorrow’s leaders, strengthened by learning about the works of yesterday’s leaders. We did not create the values that our professional world exhibits toward service to young adults. But we can choose how to thrive in this world if we recognize it for what it is—and we can’t do that without knowing its history. I also hope we do not wait too long for writers and scholars in the future to pursue the many questions still only incubating in this time line.—AB.

The Chronology

1803 Caleb Bingham donates 150 books for the use of children 9 to 16 years of age, becoming the Bingham Youth Library in Salisbury, Connecticut (Stone, 140).

1820 General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen opens apprentice library in New York (Stone, 142).

• William Wood founds Mechanics Apprentices Library in Boston (Stone, 142).

• A free library for apprentices is formed in Philadelphia (Stone, 142).

1823 Brooklyn Youth Library opens in Brooklyn, New York (Stone, 143).

1835 New York is first state to pass legislation permitting voters in any school district to levy a tax for libraries (Department of the Interior, 39).

1836 Young Men’s Mercantile Library founded in Cincinnati (Stone, 145-6).

1841 Young Men’s Association Library founded in Chicago (Stone, 147-8).

1851 First Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA) library in Boston (Stone, 72).

1852 First compulsory school attendance laws passed in Massachusetts—established by all states by 1918 (Alexander and Jordan, 10).

1866 Massachusetts law makes 10 years the minimum age of employment and 6 months of schooling per year a condition of employment for children ages 10 to 16 (Alexander and Jordan, 9).

1873 The first young adult nonfiction book, What Every Young Man Should Know, is published as a reaction to “dangerous sexual times” (Campbell).

1876 Samuel S. Green’s address at American Library Association (ALA) conference, “Personal Relations Between Librarian and Readers,” includes directions for assisting youth patrons (Cannons, 137).

1879 ALA Annual Conference in Boston emphasizes fiction and reading for the young (McDowell, Pierce).

1892 Landmark model legislation for development of school libraries passed in New York (Ramsey).

1896 ALA appoints Committee on Cooperation with the National Education Association (NEA), and NEA appoints NEA Library Department (Pond, 110-113). [These appointments occurred simultaneously—this initial push was from ALA president John Cotton Dana, with some assistance from Melvil Dewey (Jenkins)].

1905 G. Stanley Hall presents “What Children Read and What They Ought to Read” to the NEA (Pierce).

• Hall’s Adolescence published by Appleton in New York (Pierce).

1906 Virginia’s first school library opens (Ramsey).

1912 High School Department established under jurisdiction of Smaller Branches and High School Libraries Department in Cleveland Public Library (Braverman, 177).

• Herbert Cowig reports study by a teacher in New Haven High School in Connecticut that results in 22 letters from young adults to the public library, requesting a separate service (Johnson, 2).

1913 Round Table of Normal and High School Librarians meets informally at ALA Midwinter meeting (AASL History).

• Two students of New York Public Library’s Library School present a study asking whether libraries need a separate department for young people (Johnson, 2).

1914 “Blowing Out a Boy’s Brains” by Franklin K. Mathiews, chief librarian of the Boy Scouts of America, is published—leading the call for good books for boys that culminates in the founding of Children’s Book Week in 1918 (Mathiews).

• ALA School Libraries Section is approved (Pond, 736-37).

• Mary Ely presents “Our Present Problem” at ALA Annual Conference (Pierce).

1915 School Libraries Section of ALA holds first meeting at ALA Annual Conference (AASL History).

• Mary E. Hall elected as the section’s first president (AASL History).

• Alice G. Whitbeck’s Reading of Older Boys and Girls published in ALA Bulletin (Pierce).1916 Mabel Williams comes to New York to work as a children’s librarian in the New York Public Library (Braverman, 114).

1917 Mabel Williams is appointed Assistant Superintendent of Work with Schools at New York Public Library under Anne Carroll Moore (Braverman, 114).

1920 Mabel Williams is appointed Superintendent of Work with Schools at New York Public Library (Braverman, 114).

• School Department in New York Public Library is formed under Annie Spencer Cutter, administering classroom libraries in all levels and kinds of schools (Braverman, 177-78).

• Standard Library Organization and Equipment for Secondary Schools of Different Sizes issued as a Report of the Committee on Library Organization and Equipment of the National Education Association and of the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, under C. C. Certain, Chair (Ramsey).

1921 Kansas City Public Library in Missouri sets up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1922 ALA’s School Libraries Section finally gets constitution and bylaws (AASL History).

1923 Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) founded (Ramsey).

1924 Mabel Williams moves from the Office of Work with Children at Fifth Ave. & 42nd St., Room 105, to her own separate office at the 58th St. Branch of the New York Public Library (Sayers, 203).

• The Horn Book begins publication in Boston (Ramsey).

• Albany Public Library sets up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1925 Public libraries in Cleveland, New York City, and Trenton, New Jersey, set up separate services for young people (Johnson, 5).

1926 Amelia Munson is appointed special assistant to Williams for work with continuation schools at the New York Public Library (Braverman, 114).

• The Robert Louis Stevenson Room for young people under Jean C. Roos opens in the Main Library of Cleveland Public Library (Braverman, 178).

• Public libraries in Dayton, Ohio; White Plains, New York; and Los Angeles set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1927 Public libraries in Duluth, Minnesota, and Mt. Vernon, New York, set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1928 The High School Library by Hannah Logasa published (Ramsey).

• Public libraries in Atlanta, Georgia; Nashville, Tennessee; and Pittsburgh set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1929 First edition of Books for Young People, subsequently to become Books for the Teenage, is published in New York Public Library (Campbell, 17).

• Public libraries in Brooklyn, New York; East Cleveland, Ohio; Newark, New Jersey; South Bend, Indiana; and Springfield, Illinois, set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

• Mary Ware Dennett arrested for distributing her book, The Sex Side of Life: An Explanation for Young People—decision overturned 1930 (Jenkins, 137).

1930 Formation of Young People’s Reading Roundtable (YPRRT) as part of ALA’s Children’s Library Association—“young people” referring to those later called “young adults” (Jenkins).

• First youth services textbook, Effie L. Power’s Library Work with Children, includes a chapter on “library service to adolescents” (Jenkins, 84).

• First school and reference assistant is appointed in a New York Public Library branch, Chatham Square (Braverman, 114).

The Library in the School by Lucile Fargo is published (Ramsey).

• Evanston Public Library in Illinois sets up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1931 ALA-NEA Committee on Cooperation is renamed School Libraries Committee (AASL History).

• Public libraries in Long Beach, California; Providence, Rhode Island; and Chicago set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1932 Margaret Alexander Edwards joins staff of Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore (Braverman, 240).

• ALA establishes the Board on Library Service to Children and Young People in School and Public Libraries (Pond, 395-96).

1933 Alice Louise LeFevre suggests information needed for a public library to determine whether a separate service is needed in New York (Johnson, 2).

• Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore sets up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).1935 NEA’s School Libraries Committee merges with the ALA School Libraries Section (AASL History).

• Public libraries in Ponca City, Oklahoma; Portland, Oregon; Toledo, Ohio; and the District of Columbia set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1936 ALA funds School and Children’s Library Division, which includes YPPRT (Anderson, 43; Jenkins, 125).

• Public libraries in Bennington, Vermont; New Rochelle, New York; Newton, Massachusetts; and Rochester, New York, set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1937 Margaret Edwards appointed full-time young people’s librarian at Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore (Braverman, 240).

• Publication of first YA professional book, The Public Library and the Adolescent by E. Leyland (Jenkins).

• Public libraries in Lakewood, Ohio, and San Diego, California, set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1938 Library Bill of Rights adopted by board of Des Moines Public Library in Iowa (Jenkins, 660).

• Public libraries in Denver, Colorado, and Yonkers, New York, set up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1939 Library Bill of Rights adopted by ALA (Jenkins, 660).

• Jean C. Roos of Cleveland Public Library is chair of ALA’s Board on Library Service to Children and Young People (BLSCYP) (Jenkins, 642).

• Margaret Edwards of Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

• St. Paul Public Library in Minnesota sets up separate service for young people (Johnson, 5).

1940 Margaret Edwards completes setting up of young people’s collections in branches of Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore (Braverman, 240).

• Margaret C. Scoggin of New York Public Library is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

1941 Dedication of Nathan Strauss Branch for Children and Young People in New York Public Library (Braverman, 114).

• Office for Service to Youth is established under Jean C. Roos in Cleveland Public Library (Braverman, 178).

• Division of Library Service to Children and Young People (DLCYP) formed within ALA, comprised of a School Libraries Section and a Public Libraries Section, which in turn is comprised of a Children’s Library Association (CLA) and a Young People’s Reading Round Table (YPRRT) (Jenkins, 128-129).

• Julia F. Carter is president of DLCYP (Jenkins, 642).

• YPRRT’s petition to DLCYP Board to become a separate section voted down (Jenkins, 131).

• Sarah Beard of Brooklyn Public Library in New York is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

1942 Mary J. Cain of Indianapolis Public Library is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 643).

• Work with Schools becomes Work with Schools and Young People in the New York Public Library (Braverman, 114).

Top of the News debuts in October as an eight-page news quarterly serving the ALA Division of Libraries for Children and Young People (DLCYP) with its first editor, Gladys English of the Los Angeles Public Library (Baggett).

1943 Office for Service to Youth renamed Youth Department in Cleveland Public Library (Braverman, 178).

• Margaret Edwards takes horse-drawn book wagon service to youth in poor neighborhoods in Baltimore (Kelly, 68-9).

• Isabel Nichol of the School of Library Science in Denver, Colorado, is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

1944 Office of Work with Young People at Pratt becomes separate department headed by Margaret Edwards (Braverman, 240).

• Margaret Scoggin first uses term “young adult” in title of bibliographies published in Library Journal (Campbell, 21-22).

• Frances M. Grim of Cleveland Public Library is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

• American Association of School Librarians (AASL) name used for the first time (AASL History).

Young people crowd around Margaret Edwards and Pratt Library’s Book Wagon in Baltimore backyards, circa 1945. (PHOTO CREDIT: Sussman-Ochs, Enoch Pratt Free Library)

1945 Amelia Munson of New York Public Library is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

School Libraries for Today and Tomorrow: Functions and Standards published by the Committees on Post-War Planning of the Division of Libraries for Children and Young People and its section, the American Association of School Librarians, under Mary Peacock Douglas, Chair (Ramsey).

1946 After 3 years of no ALA meetings, YPRRT petitions DLCYP for status as a separate autonomous section, requiring a change in DLCYP constitution (Jenkins).

• Elizabeth H. Brand of Toledo Public Library is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

Margaret Edwards perches on the Pratt Library Book Wagon to help a mother and baby in Baltimore, circa 1945. (PHOTO CREDIT: Margaret Alexander Edwards Trust)

1947 YPRRT granted separate section status within DLCYP at ALA’s annual conference (Jenkins).

• YPRRT and General Federation of Women’s Clubs join publicity and fund-raising for project, “A Youth Library in Every Community” (Jenkins, 288-289).

• Mabel Williams’s department is named Office of Work with Schools and Young People in the New York Public Library (Braverman, 114).

• Youth, Communication, and Libraries presented before the Library Institute at the University of Chicago (Bernier).

• Beatrice W. Schein of Newark Public Library in New Jersey is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

1948 DLCYP/YPRRT sponsors preconference, “Youth and Libraries” (Jenkins, 288-289).

• YPRRT program, “Youth and Their Interests,” attracts 1,500 attendees (twice the number at Newbery-Caldecott Banquet) to hear Tops with Teens columnist Sheila John Daly and marketing consultant Eugene Gilbert (Jenkins, 308).

Booklist carries first annotated list of “Adult Books for Young Adults” (Jenkins, 313-318).

• Margaret Scoggin’s Outlook Tower column on books of interest to teens starts in The Horn Book, running until 1987 shortly before her death (Jenkins, 318).

• Beginning of campaign to get Nation out of all city public school libraries (Jenkins, 339-345).

• Lillian J. Lawyer of Washington Public Library is chair of YPPRT (Jenkins, 642-658).

• ALA’s Committee on Post-war Planning publishes The Public Library Plans for the Teen Age in conjunction with the Division of Libraries for Children and Young People (DLCYP) and its section, the Young  People’s Reading Round Table (YPRRT) (American Library Association, The Public Library Plan for the Teen Age).

1949 Elinor Walker of Carnegie Public Library in Pittsburgh is chair of the Association of Young People’s Librarians (AYPL) (Jenkins).

• Young People’s Reading Round Table (YPRRT) changes its name to the Association of Young People’s Librarians (AYPL) (Jenkins,April 2, 2007).

1950 Fiftieth anniversary of organization of youth services librarians (Jenkins, 395).

• Last meeting of DLCYP as united group of both school and public youth librarians (Jenkins, 395).

• Margaret Edwards is appointed Coordinator of Work with Young People with an assistant coordinator and a head of the Central Y Collection in Baltimore (Braverman, 240).

An Ample Field by Amelia Munson published (Campbell, 20).

• Blanche Brauneck of New York Public Library is chair of AYPL (Jenkins, 642-658).

1951 AASL becomes separate ALA division (Jenkins, 662).

• Office of Work with Schools and Young People becomes Office of Work with Young People and Margaret Scoggin is appointed young people’s specialist and assistant to Mabel Williams in New York Public Library (Braverman, 114).

• YA Services Division of New York Library Association formed with Margaret Scoggin as first chair (Hannigan, 859).

• Grace P. Slocum of Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore is chair of AYPL (Jenkins, 642-658).

• Laura K. Martin is AASL president (AASL History).

1952 Margaret Scoggin is appointed Superintendent of Work with Young People in New York Public Library with Lillian Morrison appointed as assistant to Scoggin (Braverman, 114).

• American Heritage young people’s project, “It’s Our America,” begins (Jenkins, 418-419).

• Controversy at ALA over Two and the Town reported by Margaret Edwards (Jenkins, 444-445).

• Association of Young People’s Librarians (AYPL) holds ALA preconference on “Work with Young People” (Jenkins, 437-445).

• AYPL’s Book Selection Committee prepares first precursor of Best Books for Young Adults list (Starr).

• Mildred C. Ludeck of Detroit Public Library is chair of AYPL (Jenkins, 642-658).

• Mary Lee Keath is AASL president (AASL History).

1953 Madeline Margo of Youngstown Public Library in Ohio is chair of AYPL (Jenkins, 642-658).

• Alice Books McGuire is AASL president (AASL History).

1954 First edition of Patterns in Reading by Jean C. Roos published (Hannigan, 861).

• School Library Journal added to Library Journal (Ramsey).

• Dorothy Lawson of Indianapolis Public Library is chair of AYPL (Jenkins, 642-658).

• Nancy Jane Day is AASL president (AASL History).

1955 Office of Work with Young People becomes Office of Work with Young Adults in New York Public Library (Braverman, 115).

• Frances Henne publishes Basic Need in Library: Service for Youth in Library Quarterly (Bernier).

• Frances Grim of Cleveland Public Library is chair of AYPL (Jenkins).

• Dilla W. MacBean is AASL president (AASL History).

1956 Lillian L. Batchelor is AASL president (AASL History).

1957 Young Adult Services Division (YASD) established as a separate division within ALA, splitting from Children’s Library Association (CLA); Mildred Batchelder is first Executive Secretary serving both divisions (Starr).

• Frances Grim of Cleveland Public Library moves from AYPL Chair to become first YASD president (Jenkins); then Jane S. McClure is elected president of YASD (Murphy).

Bookbait: Detailed Notes on Adult Books Popular with Young People, edited by Elinor Walker, is published by ALA (Chelton).

• Margaret Edwards wins Grolier Award—established 1954 to honor librarians for “unusual contribution to the stimulation and guidance of reading by children and young people” (ALA Web site).

• Mary Gaver is AASL president (AASL History).

1958 Youth Department renamed Young Adult Department in Cleveland Public Library (Braverman, 178).

• Pauline Winnick is YASD president (Murphy).

• Elenore Alexander is AASL president (AASL History).

1959 Pauline O’Melia is YASD president (Murphy).

• Esther Burrin is AASL president (AASL History).

1960 Young Adult Services in the Public Library published by ALA’s Committee on Standards for Work with Young Adults (Jones et al.).

• YASD sends delegates to White House Conference on Youth with their publication, “Youth in a Changing World” (Starr).

• Margaret Scoggin wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• Thirteen African American high school students enter segregated main library in Danville, Virginia, refusing to leave (Graham, 71).

Standards for School Library Programs published by AASL in cooperation with the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (Ramsey).

• Hanna Hunt is YASD president (Murphy).

• Elizabeth O. Williams is AASL president (AASL History).

1961 AASL wins right to evaluate and select materials used solely for school use (Starr).

• Sara L. Siebert is YASD president (Murphy).

• Sara I. Fenwick is AASL president (AASL History).

1962 Lucile Hatch is YASD president (Murphy).

• Cora Paul Bomar is AASL president (AASL History).

1963 Knapp School Libraries Project set up with Knapp Foundation funds (Ramsey).

• Audrey Biel is YASD president (Murphy).

• Jean Lowrie is AASL president (AASL History).

1964 Mildred L. Krohn is YASD president (Murphy).

• Virginia McJenkin is AASL president (AASL History).

1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is passed—Title II provides funds for the purchase of library materials and textbooks (Ramsey).

• Opal C. Eagle is YASD president (Murphy).

• Eleanor E. Ahlers is AASL president (AASL History).

1966 Ruth Tarbox becomes Executive Secretary of YASD and CLA (Starr).

• YASD produces “Guidelines for Young Adult Services in Public Libraries” (Starr).

• YASD holds its first preconference, “Two Blocks Apart,” sponsored by its Disadvantaged Committee at ALA Annual Conference (Starr).

• Florence M. Sanborn is YASD president (Murphy).

• Richard L. Darling is AASL president (AASL History).

1967 Cleveland Board of Education takes over jurisdiction of personnel in school libraries (Braverman, 178).

• The first edition of Books and the Teen-age Reader by G. Robert Carlsen is published by Harper & Row (Chelton).

Impact: The School Library and the Instructional Program, A Report on Phase I of the Knapp School Libraries Project by Peggy Sullivan published (Ramsey).

• “Age” is added to the Library Bill of Rights (Krug).

• YASD cosponsors “Intellectual Freedom and the Teenager” preconference with ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Committee at ALA Annual Conference (Starr).

• Mary L. Woodworth is YASD president (Murphy).

• Carolyn Whiteneck is AASL president (AASL History).

1968 School Department of Cleveland Public Library dissolved (Braverman, 178).

• Lillian Morrison becomes Coordinator of YA Services at New York Public Library (Campbell, 11).

Hooked on Books: Program and Proof by Daniel Fader published by Berkeley (Liesner & Chisholm, 24).

• School Library Manpower Project set up with Knapp Foundation funds (Ramsey).

• Julia M. Losinski is YASD president (Murphy).

• Phyllis Hochstettler is AASL president (AASL History).

1969 The Fair Garden and the Swarm of Beasts: The Library and the Young Adult by Margaret A. Edwards published by Hawthorn Books (Jones et al).

Library Trends publishes theme issue, “Young Adult Service in the Public Library” (Jones et al).

The School Library: A Force for Educational Excellence by Ruth Ann Davies published by Bowker (Ramsey).

• Elaine Simpson is YASD president (Murphy).

• John Rowell is AASL president (AASL History).

1970 School Library Manpower Project: Phase I—Final Report to the Knapp Foundation of North Carolina, Inc. published by the School Library Manpower Project Advisory Committee (Ramsey)

• Julia Losinski wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• Mary Ann Hanna is YASD president (Murphy).

• Roberta Young is AASL president (AASL History).

1971 YASD presents “The Young Adult in the Media World” preconference, focusing on audio-visual materials at ALA Annual Conference (Starr).

• Sara Siebert wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• Jane Manthorne is YASD president (Murphy).

• Frances Hatfield is AASL president (AASL History).

1972 “Free Access to Minors, An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights” adopted June 30 (ALA Web site).

• Thomas Alford is YASD president (Murphy).

• Elenora Portteus is AASL president (AASL History).

1973 Young Adult Alternative Newsletter begun by Carol Starr (Starr, Nov. 2).

• Mary Jane Anderson becomes Executive Secretary of YASD and CLA (Starr).

• Marilee Foglesong is YASD president (Murphy).

• Bernard Franckowiak is AASL president (AASL History).

1974 Knapp School Libraries Project and School Library Manpower Project end (Ramsey).

• Title IV of ESEA consolidates funding for public and private schools and dilutes support for school library purchases of materials and hardware (Ramsey).

• School Library Journal becomes separate publication from Library Journal (Ramsey).

Look, Listen, Explain: Developing Community Library Services for Young Adults published by ALA (Starr).

• Regina Minudri wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• Carol Starr is YASD president (Murphy).

• Helen D. L. Snoke is AASL president (AASL History).

1975 At YASD’s “Book You” preconference at ALA Annual Conference, fifteen years of Best Books for Young Adults (BBYA) selections are analyzed to produce “Best of the Best: Still Alive in 75,” the first of many such exercises (Starr).

• Helen Kreigh is YASD president (Murphy).

• Judith G. Letsinger is AASL president (AASL History).

1976 YASD establishes their own office and part-time staff as well as their own division’s Intellectual Freedom Committee (Fine, YALSA Web site).

• Mary K. Chelton is YASD president (Murphy).

• Peggy Pfeiffer is AASL president (AASL History).

1977 YASD produces Directions for Library Service to Young Adults (Starr).

• Evelyn Shaevel becomes YASD’s first full-time Executive Secretary (Fine).

• Rosemary Young is YASD president (Murphy).

• Frances C. Dean is AASL president (AASL History).

• YA Hotline begins publication out of Dalhousie University School of Library Service in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; its first issue is dated October 1977 (The Top, Top of the News,Winter 1978).

• YASD Research Committee publishes Media and the Young Adult: A Selected Bibliography, 1950-1972 (YASD Research Committee, Top of the News).

• YASD produces a “Survival Kit,” justifying young adult services as a part of any total public library program (The Top, Top of the News, Winter 1977).

1978 Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA) begins publication (Chelton).

Emergency Librarian newsletter, founded in 1973, changes focus to school librarianship (Teacher Librarian website).

• The Young Adult Perplex column by Patty Campbell begins in Wilson Library Bulletin (Campbell, 32).

• “Dispelling the Hi-Lo Blues” preconference, cosponsored with Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), presented by YASD at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Bruce Daniels is YASD president (Murphy).

• Anna Mary Lowrey is AASL president (AASL History).

• YASD/RASD Committee on Service to the Spanish-speaking publishes first edition of Libros a tu Gusto, a list of books available in Spanish for young adults (The Top, Top of the News, Summer 1978).

• YASD Board of Directors establishes a committee on Library Services for Spanish-Speaking Youth (The Top,Top of the News, Spring 1978).

• YASD’s first regional institute, “Adolescent Sexuality and the Role of the Youth Librarian,” is hosted by Villanova University Graduate Department of Library Science (The Top,Top of the News, Spring 1979).

1979 Youth Caucus attends as delegates to White House Conference on Library and Information Services (Dickson, 207).

Media Programs: District and School published by AASL and AECT (Ramsey).

• Eleanor Pourron is YASD president (Murphy).

• Rebecca Bingham is AASL president (AASL History).

• Youth Caucus attends as delegates to the White House Conference on Library and Information Services (Dickson, 207); one of its resolutions recommends installing teen voting members in library boards on every level—state, national, and local (Lippman).

1980 First edition of Kenneth L. Donelson’s and Alleen Pace Nilsen’s textbook, Literature for Today’s Young Adults, published (Lenz & Mahood, vii).

• Young Adult Alternative Newsletter ceases publication (Starr, Nov. 2).

Young Adult Literature: Background and Criticism published by ALA (Chelton).

• “Research: The How and Why of It” preconference presented by YASD at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Mabel Williams wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• YASD Executive Secretary Evelyn Shaevel’s title is changed to Executive Director (Starr).

• Audrey Eaglen is YASD president (Murphy).

• D. Philip Baker is AASL president and AASL holds its first national conference in Louisville, Kentucky, with the theme “80s and Beyond” (AASL History).

1981 School Library Quarterly begins publication (Ramsey).

Young Adults Deserve the Best: Competencies for Librarians Serving Young Adults published by YASD (Gottschalk).

• Evie Wilson-Lingbloom is YASD president (Murphy).

• Betty Jo Buckingham is AASL president (AASL History).

YASD publishes “Sex Education for Adolescents: A Bibliography of Low-Cost Materials,” in partnership with Planned Parenthood and the American Academy of Pediatrics (Eaglen).

• First book on booktalking, Booktalk!  Booktalking and School Visiting for Young Adult Audiences by Joni Bodart, published (HW Wilson Company).

YASD establishes ad hoc Youth Participation in Library Decision-Making Committee to expedite the inclusion of teens in voting capacities on library boards (Lippman).

• First meeting of YASD Computer Applications to Young Adult Services Discussion Group is held at ALA Annual Conference (The Top, Top of the News, Spring 1981, 213).

• YASD Board establishes YASD Publications Committee with charge of developing a publication program in the areas of YA services and materials and identifying topics, coordinating YASD publications, and preparing guidelines for YASD publications (The Top, Top of the News, Spring 1981, 214).

1982 YASD establishes annual grants for librarians with vendors’ support, including the YASD/VOYA Research Grant and the Baker & Taylor Conference Grant (Fine).

• “Booktalking Challenge: Serving Deaf and Hearing Impaired Children, Young Adults, and Their Parents” preconference is cosponsored by YASD with the Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Barbara Newmark-Kruger is YASD president (Murphy).

• Dorothy Blake is AASL president and AASL holds its second national conference in Houston on the theme “82: A New Emphasis” (AASL History).

Evie Wilson’s YASD President’s Program is “Youth Participation in Library Decision-Making,” the division’s debut program on the topic, which offers the first youth participation guidelines for libraries (Lippman).

• YASD produces “Competencies for Librarians Serving Youth” (Perritt and Heim).

1983 Youth Participation in School and Public Libraries manual published by YASD (Fine).

• Another “Best of the Best” (BBYA) preconference presented by YASD at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Penelope S. Jeffrey is YASD president (Murphy).

• Judith King is AASL president (AASL History).

YASD publishes Youth Participation in School and Public Libraries in partnership with the National Commission on Resources for Youth, expanding youth participation goals to give “young adults real control and responsibility for developing and carrying out projects” (Lippman).

1984 Alliance for Excellence published in response to A Nation at Risk (Dickson, 236).

School Library Media Annual published by Libraries Unlimited (Ramsey).

• First YASD Baker & Taylor Conference Grant is awarded to enable two YA librarians to attend their first ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• “Cable Untangled” preconference, cosponsored with ALSC, presented by YASD at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Lydia LaFleur is YASD president (Murphy).

• Elizabeth Day is AASL president and AASL holds third national conference in Atlanta with the theme “Challenge 84: Mission Possible” (AASL History).

1985 YASD receives National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) grant, “Courtly Love in the Shopping Mall,” to train librarians working with youth to do humanities programs (Fine, Bernier).

• Mary K. Chelton wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• First Frances Henne/YASD/VOYA Research Grant awarded to fund research in the areas of young adult services and/or materials (Fine).

• Joan Atkinson is YASD president (Murphy).

• Shirley L. Aaron is AASL president (AASL History).

ALA publishes Magazines for Young Adults, the first guide of its kind recognizing young adult specialists’ need for guidance in this area as separate from school librarians (The Top, Top of the News, Fall 1984).

In an open letter to librarians, the Young Adult Advisory Board (YAAB) at Enoch Pratt Central Library in Baltimore, Maryland, appeals for more youth involvement in YASD’s Best Books for Young Adults (BBYA) list (Up for Discussion,VOYA August 1985).

1986 “Myths vs. Realities: An Intimate Behind-the-Scenes Perspective on YA Publishing” preconference presented by YASD at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Marion Hargrove is YASD president (Murphy).

• Marilyn L. Miller is AASL president and AASL holds its fourth national conference in Minneapolis with the theme “Focus 86: The Curriculum and You” (AASL History).

A proposal for an annual youth-produced version of the BBYA list is sent to the YASD Youth Participation Committee by the Young Adult Advisory Board (YAAB) at Enoch Pratt Central Library in Baltimore,Maryland (MacRae).

• YASD’s Intellectual Freedom Committee publishes “You Are Not Alone—Intellectual Freedom Issues and Library Services to Youth” packet (The Top, Top of the News, Spring 1986).

1987 Top of the News, serving both children’s and young adult librarians since 1942, ceases publication under that title and becomes The Journal of Youth Services in Libraries (JOYS) (Karrenbrock).

• YASD preconference, “Courtly Love in the Shopping Mall: Library Programming for Young Adults with a Humanities Focus,” supports the 1985 NEH grant at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Lillian Morrison wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• Vivian Wynn is YASD president (Murphy).

• Karen A. Whitney is AASL president (AASL History).

1988 First National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) national survey of YA services in public libraries published (Fine).

• Library Trends publishes theme issue, “Library Services to Youth: Preparing for the Future” (Jones et al).

• SLJ/YASD YA Author Achievement Award begins biannually, funded by School Library Journal (Fine).

• Five Genre Committees formed within YASD: Horror, Mystery, Romance, Sports, and Science Fiction (Fine).

• Another BBYA preconference, “Still Great in 88,” presented by YASD at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

Information Power: Guidelines for School Library Media Programs published by AASL and AECT (AASL History).

• Susan Madden is YASD president (Murphy).

• Jacqueline G. Morris is AASL president (AASL History).

• YASD’s Youth Participation in Library Decision-Making Committee changes status from ad hoc to permanent with a simplified name, Youth Participation Committee (MacRae).

1989 Evelyn Shaevel leaves YASD as Executive Director; YASD and AASL then share Executive Director Ann Carlson Weeks, with Susan Horiuchi as YASD Deputy Director (Fine).

• “Access for Children and Young Adults to Nonprint Materials, An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights” adopted (ALA Web site).

• Patty Campbell wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

Kids Need Libraries: School and Public Libraries Preparing the Youth of Today for the World of Tomorrow and Youth Participation in Libraries: A Training Manual published by YASD (Fine).

• “(Not So) Tough Talk: Selling Books to Young Adults the Easy Way” is YASD preconference at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Gerald Hodges is YASD president (Murphy).

• Retta Patrick is AASL president and AASL holds its fifth national conference in Salt Lake City with theme “Access to Excellence” (AASL History).

1990 First YASD Econo-Clad Award given to librarian who develops an outstanding YA program (Fine).

• YASD preconference “Just Say Know: Meeting the Information Needs of Young Adults” presented at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Christy Tyson is YASD president (Murphy).

• Winona Jones is AASL president (AASL History).

At an ALA Midwinter YASD session on January 7, the Young Adult Advisory Board (YAAB) from Enoch Pratt Central Library in Baltimore,Maryland, becomes the first teen group to speak at a BBYA meeting (Herald and Monnier).

• Pratt Central Library’s YAAB joins with teen readers from other Baltimore branches for an all-day conference to select their own “Youth-to-Youth Books: A List for Imagination and Survival,” which would later become a model for YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten Books (MacRae, The View from VOYA, June 2007; Enoch Pratt Free Library).

1991 SLJ/YASD Author Achievement Award becomes annual Margaret A. Edwards Award (Fine).

• “Genrecon” is YASD preconference at ALA Annual Conference (Fine).

• Susan Horiuchi resigns and Linda Waddle is hired as Deputy Director of YASD (Fine).

• Dorothy M. Broderick wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• Mary Elizabeth Wendt is YASD president (Murphy).

• Dawn Hansen Heller is AASL president (AASL History).

• YASD publishes Youth Participation in Libraries: A Training Manual (Youth Participation Committee).

1992 YASD changes name to Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) (Gottschalk).

• First edition of Connecting Young Adults and Libraries by Patrick Jones published by Neal-Schuman (Jones et al).

• YALSA wins ALA–World Book Goal Award for seminars on “Serving the Underserved: Customer Services for Young Adults in Public Libraries” (Gottschalk).

• Betty O’Donnell is YALSA president (Murphy).

• Ruth Toor is AASL president and AASL holds its sixth national conference in Baltimore with the theme “Challenges, Choices, Connections, Change” (AASL History).

1993 Impact of School Library Media Centers on Academic Achievement by Keith Curry Lance, Lynda Welborn, and Christien Hamilton Pennell published (Ramsey).

• The Journal of Youth Services in Libraries (JOYS) changed editors and redesigned its format (YALSA website).

• Revised edition of Directions for Library Service to Young Adults published by YALSA (Gottschalk).

Bare Bones: Young Adult Services Tips for Public Library Generalists published by the Public Library Association (PLA) and YALSA (Chelton).

• Excellence in Library Services to Young Adults project to recognize outstanding YA library programs is begun by ALA President Hardy Franklin (Chelton).

• “Libraries 2000: Planning for Tomorrow’s Young Adults Today” preconference presented by YALSA at ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans (Gottschalk).

• Mike Printz wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• Judith Druse is YALSA president (Murphy).

• E. Blanche Woolls is AASL president (AASL History).

1994 Los Angeles Public Library opens TeenS’cape, the first public library space incorporating teen-specific design features (Bernier).

• “Here We Go Again: 25 Years of Best Books” preconference presented by YALSA at ALA Annual Conference in Miami (Gottschalk).

• Jennifer Jung Gallant is YALSA president, “Youth Participation Revisited” (Murphy).

• Jacqueline Mancall is AASL president and AASL holds its seventh national conference in Indianapolis with theme “Shape the Vision: Focus on Learning” (AASL History).

• YALSA Board of Directors passes the “Youth Attendance at Best Books for Young Adults Meetings” motion allowing teens to attend one BBYA meeting at each ALA conference (MacRae).

• A joint ALA Chapter Relations/YALSA Task Force on the Teenage Library Association explores the establishment of an ALA Teenage Library Association, modeled on school library-affiliated organizations in Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, and Texas (Wendt).

1995 YALSA publishes Youth Participation in Schools and Public Libraries: It Works (Bernier).

• YALSA co-publishes Output Measures and More: Planning and Evaluating Young Adult Services by Virginia Walter with PLA and presents related “Implementing Output Measures for Library Service to Young Adults” preconference at ALA Annual Conference in Chicago (Gottschalk).

• YALSA begins Voices, a newsletter (Gottschalk).

• Patricia Muller is YALSA president, “Developing a National Leadership Agenda for Library Service to Young Adults” (Murphy).

• David Loertscher is AASL president (AASL History).

1996 Inclusion of “age” in Library Bill of Rights reaffirmed (ALA Web site).

• Deborah Taylor is first African American to hold the office of YALSA president “Consider the Possibilities: A Holistic Approach to Work with Young Adults” (Murphy).

• Barbara Stripling is AASL president (AASL History).

• The first sanctioned appearance of teens at a YALSA BBYA meeting, chaired by Audra Caplan, occurs on February 5 at ALA Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia (Herald and Monnier).

• ALA Editions publishes Youth Participation in School and Public Libraries: It Works, edited by Carolyn Caywood with YALSA’s Youth Participation Committee (Youth Participation in School and Public Libraries: It Works).

Instead of founding a national Teenage Library Association, YALSA begins a cooperative venture with Friends of Libraries USA (FOLUSA) to encourage school and public library teen groups to join the Junior Friends Network (Wendt).

1997 “Popular Reading: What Young Adults Really Read and Why” preconference presented by YALSA at ALA Annual Conference in San Francisco (dedicated to Michael Printz) (Gottschalk).

• YALSA creates Teen Hoopla Web site for teens (Gottschalk).

• Voices, the Division’s first newsletter, was published 1995-1997 and then discontinued for financial reasons.

• Michael Cart is YALSA president, “Risky Business” (Murphy).

• Ken Haycock is AASL president and AASL holds its eighth national conference in Portland, Oregon with the theme “Learning: Continue the Adventure” (AASL History).

YALSA approves national Youth Participation Guidelines (YALSA Web site).

• Julie Walker is appointed Executive Director of both AASL and YALSA (Habley).

1998 YALSA establishes Alex Awards for adult books for teens, and also Teen Read Week every October (Jones et al, 50).

• YALSA revises 1981 “Young Adults Deserve the Best: Competencies for Librarians Serving Young Adults” (YALSA Web site).

• Patty Campbell’s Two Pioneers of Young Adult Library Services, profiling Mabel Williams and Margaret Edwards, published by Scarecrow Press in VOYA Occasional Papers series (MacRae/VOYA).

Emergency Librarian changes name to Teacher Librarian (Teacher Librarian Web site).

Information Power published by AASL (Jones et al, 50).

• Joel Shoemaker is YALSA president, “Come Together at the Library” (Murphy).

• Sharon Coatney is AASL president (AASL History).

1999 DeWitt Wallace Reader’s Digest Fund supports Public Libraries as Partners in Youth Development (Bernier).

• YALSA establishes Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature (YALSA Web site).

• Jana Fine is YALSA president, “Sound Bytes, Billboards, Neon Lights: Marketing to Teens” (Murphy).

• M. Ellen Jay is AASL president and AASL holds its ninth national conference in Birmingham, Alabama, with theme “Unleash the Power! Knowledge, Technology, Diversity” (AASL History).

• YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten Task Force begins its first pilot project with two teen test groups in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Mesa, Arizona (Krahnke; FYI: Testing . . . the Teens’ Top Ten Best Books 1999).

2000 “Best of the Best Revisited: BoJo Jones and Beyond” BBYA preconference presented by YALSA at ALA Annual Conference  in Chicago (Gottschalk).

• Michael Cart wins Grolier Award (ALA Web site).

• Mary Arnold is YALSA president (Murphy).

• Harriet S. Selverstone is AASL president (AASL History).

2001 Los Angeles Public Library reinstates YA Coordinator position and converts most part-time YA librarians to full-time (Bernier).

• YALSA’s quarterly electronic newsletter YAttitudes begins with Fall 2001 issue (YALSA Web site).

• “SF in SF: Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Teens” is YALSA’s preconference at ALA Annual Conference (VOYA June 2001).

• Bonnie Kunzel is YALSA president (Murphy).

• Helen R. Adams is AASL president and AASL holds its tenth national conference in Indianapolis with theme “Coming Together as a Community of Learners” (AASL History).

YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten merges with another pilot project, YA Galley, whose sixteen teen groups receive galleys from publishers and send reviews back in exchange (FYI: Teens’ Top Ten Books 2001).

• YALSA creates a Youth Participation Coordinator position to manage teen participants in the organization and its conference programs (Herald and Monnier).

2002 First Lady Laura Bush hosts White House Conference on school libraries (Ramsey).

• YALSA’s and ALSC’s Journal of Youth Services ceases publication with Summer issue and YALSA’s own Young Adult Library Services (YALS) begins publication (Murphy).

• YALSA’s “Getting Graphic @ Your Library” preconference about graphic novels draws a crowd at ALA Annual Conference (VOYA April 2002).

• Linda Waddle retires as YALSA Deputy Director and Cindy Welch takes her place (YALSA Web site).

• Caryn Sipos is YALSA president (Murphy).

• Nancy P. Zimmerman is AASL president (AASL History).

YALSA’s and ALSC’s joint publication, Journal of Youth Services in Libraries, ceases with the Summer issue, to be replaced by two journals, one for each division: YALSA’s Young Adult Library Services (YALS) and ALSC’s Children and Libraries (Murphy).

• YALSA’s YA Galley Committee is created to administer Teens’ Top Ten Books (MacRae).

2003 YALSA’s first annual list of Teens’ Top Ten Books is chosen by teens online during Teen Read Week (VOYA December 2003).

• YALSA’s preconference is “SLAM THIS! Poetry for and with Teens” at ALA Annual Conference (VOYA April 2003).

• Audra Caplan is YALSA president (Murphy).

• Frances R. Roscello is AASL president and AASL holds its eleventh national conference in Kansas City, Missouri, with theme of “Information Matters” (AASL History).

• (MySpace is launched online)

2004 With the significant growth of the division, Beth Anne Yoke becomes YALSA’s first full-time Executive Director. Julie Walker remains as Executive Director of AASL (Murphy; Habley).

• David C.Mowery is YALSA president (Murphy).

• Dawn P.Vaughn is AASL president (Habley).

• (Facebook launched online at Harvard University)

• (Flickr is launched online)

2005 Pam Spencer Holley is YALSA president (Murphy).

• J. Linda Williams is AASL president (Habley).

• (YouTube is launched online)

2006 Judy T. Nelson is YALSA president (Murphy).

• Cyndi Phillip is AASL president (Habley).

• YALSA establishes a blog in January at http://yalsa.ala.org/blog/.

• (Twitter is launched online)

2007 YALSA celebrates its 50th year as the world leader in recommending reading, listening, and viewing for teens (YALSA Web site).

• Paula Brehm Heeger is YALSA president. (YALSA website)

• Sara Kelly Johns is AASL President. (AASL History)

• YALSA establishes a Twitter account at http://twitter.com/#!/yalsa.

• YALSA establishes a wiki in January at http://wikis.ala.org/yalsa/.

2008 Sarah Debraski is YALSA president. (YALSA website)

• Ann M. Martin is AASL President. (AASL History)

2009 Linda Braun is YALSA president. (YALSA website)

• Cassandra G. Barnett is AASL President. (AASL History)

2010 Kimberly Patton is YALSA president. (YALSA website)

• Dr. Nancy Everhart is AASL President. (AASL History)

2011 Sarah Flowers is YALSA president. (YALSA website)

• Carl A. Harvey III is AASL president. (AASL website)

• YALSA establishes The HUB, a young adult literature based blog at http://www.yalsa.ala.org/thehub/.

SOURCES

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Anderson, Dorothy. Mildred I. Batchelder: A Study in Leadership. Ph. D. Dissertation, Texas Women’s   University, 1981.

Baggett, Carolyn. Happy Birthday, TOP OF THE NEWS! A Brief Look at Its First Forty Years. Top of the News, Vol. 39, No. 1, Fall 1982, 114-117.

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Bernier, Anthony. E-mail communication, October 26, 2011.

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Cannons, H. G. T. Bibliography of Library Economy: A Classified Index to the Professional   Periodical Literature in the English Language Relating to Library Economy, Printing, Methods of   Publishing, Copyright, Bibliography, Etc., from 1876-1920. ALA, 1927.

Chelton, Mary K. Personal knowledge of event or personal ownership of book.

Department of the Interior, Bureau of Education. Public Libraries in the United States of America: Their   History, Condition, and Management, A Special Report. Washington, GPO, 1876. Reprinted as part of   University of Illinois Graduate School of Library Science. Public Libraries in the United States of   America: Part I-1876 Report. Monograph Series, Number 4.

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The Top. Top of the News: Vol. 33, No. 2, Winter 1977, 119; Vol. 34, No. 2, Winter 1978, 119; Vol. 34, No. 3, Spring 1978, 214; Vol. 34, No. 4, Summer 1978, 317; Vol. 35, No. 3, Spring 1979, 219; Vol. 37, No. 3, Spring 1981, 213; Vol. 37, No. 3, Spring 1981, 214; Vol. 41, No. 1, Fall 1984, 16; Vol. 42, No. 3, Spring 1986, 209.

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Wendt, Ma’lis. YALSA Teenage Library Association Task Force Reports, 1993–1996.

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Youth Participation in School and Public Libraries: It Works. Carolyn Caywood, Ed. ALA Editions, 1995.

Anthony Bernier, one of the four original 2005 Chronology compilers, is Assistant Professor of Youth Services at San Jose State University’s School of Library and Information Science in California. He is former Director of Teen Services at Oakland Public Library, following ten years as Young Adult Specialist Librarian for the Los Angeles Public Library. He received a Ph.D. in History from the University of California in 2002.

Mary K. Chelton, a co-founder of VOYA, is a professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Studies, Queens College, City University of New York. Her 1997 dissertation on YA services is Adult-Adolescent Service Encounters: The Library Context. She is the editor of three editions of Excellence in Library Services for Young Adults for the Young Adult Library Services Association of ALA. Among her many articles is The Problem Patron that Public Libraries Created: The Normal Adolescent, The Reference Librarian, nos. 75/76, June, 2002, 23-33.

Christine A. Jenkins, an associate professor in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, received her Ph. D. at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with her dissertation, Strength of the Inconspicuous: Youth Services Librarians, the American Library Association, and Intellectual Freedom for the Young, 1939-1955. Her research focuses on the history of school and public library service to children and young adults; youth services librarians as canon-shapers and intellectual freedom advocates; U.S. librarians and Cold War censorship; and gay/lesbian content in young adult literature.

Jennifer Burek Pierce is an assistant professor at the Indiana University (IU) School of Library and Information Science’s Indianapolis program. She earned her doctorate at IU’s Department of Communication and Culture in rhetorical studies, with her dissertation focusing on maternal and child health issues during the Progressive Era. Among her recent publications is What’s Harry Potter Doing in the Library? Depictions of Young Adult Information Seeking Behavior in Contemporary Fantasy Fiction, Selected Papers of From Aesop to E-Book: The Story Goes On . . . , June 2004, 73-82.

Cathi Dunn MacRae collected library youth participation milestones for this Chronology update in conjunction with the preparation of two June 2007 VOYA pieces about youth participation in YALSA: her editorial and Herald and Monnier’s article, The Beasts Have Arrived. She was Editor-in-Chief of VOYA from 1997 to 2007. Previously she spent twenty years as a young adult librarian in public libraries in Maryland and Colorado.

The Editor wishes to thank Joseph Eagan, Teresa Edmonds, and Richard Oloizia of Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore; and Julian Lapides of the Margaret Alexander Edwards Trust; for entrusting VOYA with irreplaceable historical documents as illustrations for this article. Carol Starr’s generosity in donating original copies of her Young Adult Alternative Newsletter (beloved by this editor as a fledgling YA librarian) is also greatly appreciated.

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4 Comments

  1. Helen Stuetzel says:

    I love this document; it has proved invaluable to me in the graduate course I teach in YA Lit. But…I am a bit distressed that there are no entries beyond 2007….especially considering how vibrant the field is right now. I know you rely upon submissions from others, in addition to your own research, but….nothing? With due respect and thanks, though….I do love and value this document. It really shakes my students up to know that while the interest among professionals in YA lit has been lengthy, it has taken publishers and schools quite a bit longer to catch on! Thanks….

  2. Hi Helen – thanks for your thoughtful and supportive comments on the time line.
    Like all publications, even historical publications, history (and its authors) move on. And the energies the original contributors devoted to this project have been diverted to others.

    We did want to encourage the Community Brain to continue to develop (and even correct) content in this YA services time line. And though we have received much praise for the work we’ve enjoyed much less continuing support for additions.

    However, if you and/or your students would like to advance nominations for consideration they will be reviewed with great care.

    ~anthony

  3. Week 2 class promises | LBSCI 739 MATERIALS FOR YOUNG ADULTS says:

    […] 200 years of Young Adult Library Services. You can find milestones for YA […]

  4. […] Bernier, Anthony, Mary K. Chelton, Christine A. Jenkins, and Jennifer B. Pierce. “Two Hundred Years of Young Adult Library Services: A Chronology.” Voice of Youth Advocates. 28, 106-111.  (2005 June). Available: http://www.voyamagazine.com/2010/03/30/chronology/ […]

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